Vocational Rehabilitation Outcomes for individuals with brain injury – per the RSA

A number of people who attended my presentations in Salem last week (annual Oregon Voc Rehab In-service Conference) asked me to post the “Vocational Rehabilitation Outcomes” tables used in my PowerPoint. The Tables and Summaries were provided by Frank A. Smith, who can be contacted at Frank.Smith@UMB.edu.

Voc Rehab Outcomes for consumers with TBI per the RSA.

  • Table 1: Total VR exiters in 1012
  • Table 2: Percentage of individuals with TBI that successfully returned to the workplace for at least 90 days after placement
  • Table 3: What percentage of the time do people work (hours per week)
  • Tables 4 & 5: Average length of time a case is open (months or range of months)
  • Tables 6 & 7: Average cost and or range of costs to the VR agency

Summary of Table #1:

Individuals with TBI were approximately 2% of all people who exited state VR programs in 2012. Most individuals with TBI who exited (95%) were marked has having a significant disability. Comparatively, 92% of other cognitively impaired individuals and 89% of all others with no TBI or cognitive impairment had a significant disability.

Summary of Table #2:

When an individual exits their VR program, a VR counselor assigns a “closure status” to each individual. The ideal outcome is that a person exits with an employment outcome. As Table 2 shows, about 35% of all individuals who exited VR in 2012 exited with an employment outcome. Looking at the four disability groups in Table 2 we see that when compared to the other groups, individuals with TBI have a lower rate of exiting into employment than individuals from other disability groups. This is true for people with TBI who do or do not have a significant disability.

Summary of Table #3:

Looking at the four disability groups in Table 3, we see individuals with TBI who exit their VR program with a job work fewer hours per week on average than individuals from other disability groups. For all disability groups in Table 3, individuals with a significant disability work fewer hours per week on average than those without a significant disability.

Summary of Table #4:

The number of days an individual is in the VR system, from the day they apply until the day they exit, can be an indicator of how well the VR system is equipped to serve individuals and can also be an indicator of how challenging it is for certain groups to complete a VR program. Looking at the columns for mean in Table 4, we see that individuals with TBI are typically in the VR system for longer than individuals from other disability groups. Not surprisingly, having a significant disability increases the amount of time and individual is in the VR system.

Summary of Table #5:

Not everyone is Table 4 is someone who exited with a job. When looking at the amount of time an individual is in the VR system, it is interesting to look at the subgroup of individuals who exited with a job. This is the group shown in Table 5. Looking at the columns for mean in Table 5, we see that individuals with TBI who exit with a job are typically in the VR system for longer than individuals from other disability groups. Not surprisingly, having a significant disability increases the amount of time and individual is in the VR system. Typically, individuals with TBI who exit with employment are in the VR system for over 2 years before exiting with a job.

Summary of Table #6:

Table 6 summary: Another metric that is interesting to look at is the total cost of services provided an individual while they were in their VR program. Compared to individuals with other disabilities, the mean cost of services purchased for individuals with TBI is typically higher. It should be noted that VR programs provide a wide range of services. Unfortunately, the RSA 911 does not allow us to know specifically how much was spent on the different services provided. It is also important to note that the cost of providing VR services may be miniscule when compared to the reduction in costs for public program transfers if a person gains sustainable employment.

Summary of Table #7:

Not everyone is Table 6 is someone who exited with a job. When looking at the cost of services purchased for an individual while they were in the VR system, it is interesting to look at the subgroup of individuals who exited with a job. This is the group shown in Table 7. Compared to individuals with other disabilities, the mean cost of services purchased for individuals with TBI is typically higher. It should be noted however that these are individuals who exited VR with employment, a very positive economic outcome.

Comments and questions are welcome.

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